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The Millinery Department Volume 8 Charlotte Rankin Aiken

The Millinery Department Volume 8

Charlotte Rankin Aiken

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230361536
Paperback
36 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1918 edition. Excerpt: ... Chapter xii principlesMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1918 edition. Excerpt: ... Chapter xii principles of color Importance of a Knowledge of Color to the Salesperson Color is a matter of very great importance in a large number of the departments in the store. In order to sell textiles, china and glass, art embroidery, draperies, rugs, ready-to-wear garments, millinery, and many other varieties of merchandise intelligently, some fundamental knowledge of color is essential. The accepted theories of color and color combinations are therefore given here briefly. Combinations of Colors There are two ways of combining colors which produce quite different results. They are: The combination of colored lights. The combination of colored pigments or dyes. When different colored lights are combined, the result is a combination of the two colors. When colored pigments are combined, one color seems to absorb or This chapter, containing the essential principles of color, was prepared by the editor and appears in several of the manuals of this series. counteract the other. One explanation of the difference is that the pigments are never perfectly pure, that is, they contain elements of other colors and therefore cannot give the same result as a combination of the similar colored lights. All colors are produced by the effect of light upon the nerves of the eye, and as the eye sees them, colors are contained within the light itself, forming when united a white or colorless light, as in sunlight. It is only when part of the light rays are in some way absorbed or intercepted that we see the remaining rays as distinct colors. The Spectrum Nearly every one has seen the band of beautiful colors which is formed by a beam of sunlight passing through a prism. The same effect is produced when the suns rays pass through the raindrops and...